Recent News

  • (8/2019) Our paper A Usability Study of Five Two-Factor Authentication Systems will appear at SOUPS 2019
  • (6/2019) Congratulations to Elham Vaziripour who accepted a position at Google
  • (6/2019) Our paper “Don’t Punish All of Us”: Measuring User Attitudes about Two-Factor Authentication will appear at EuroUSEC 2019
  • (5/2019) Our poster Automating the Authentication Ceremony in Signal appeared at IEEE Security & Privacy 2019
  • (12/2018) Congratulations to Brad Spendlove for successfully defending his MS thesis
  • (10/2018) Congratulations to Luke Dickinson for successfully defending his MS thesis. He will be joining Sandia National Labs.
  • (8/2018) Our paper  The Secure Socket API: TLS as an Operating System Service received the Facebook Internet Defense Second Prize at the USENIX Security Symposium
  • (9/2018) Former PhD student Scott Ruoti is now an Assistant Professor at the University of Tennessee
  • (7/2018) Daniel Zappala and I received a $500K grant from the NSF for our key management research
  • (6/2018) Congratulations to Ken Reese for successfully defending his MS thesis. He will be joining LucidChart.
  • (5/2018) Our paper A Tale of Two Studies: The Best and Worst of YubiKey Usability appeared at the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy
  • (8/2017) Our SOUPS 2017 paper was featured on the local news
  • (7/2017) Congratulations to former PhD student Scott Ruoti, a co-winner of the 2017 John Karat Usable Privacy and Security Student Research Award at SOUPS. The award is presented to a graduate student based on their scholarship, community service, and mentoring as a student.
  • (7/2017) Congratulations to Jeff Andersen for successfully defending his MS thesis. He has accepted a position at Google.
  • (7/2017) Our paper “Layering Security at Global Control Points to Secure Unmodified Software” was accepted to appear at SecDev 2017
  • (5/2017) Our paper TrustBase: An Architecture to Repair and Strengthen Certificate-based Authentication was accepted to appear in the 2017 USENIX Security Symposium.
  • (5/2017) Our two papers “Weighing Context and Trade-offs: How Users Select Their Online Security Posture” and “Is that you, Alice? A Usability Study of the Authentication Ceremony of Secure Messaging Applications” were accepted to appear at SOUPS 2017.
  • (11/2016) Congratulations to Travis Hendershot for successfully defending his MS thesis. He has accepted a position at Google.
  • (7/2016) Our paper TLS Proxies: Friend or Foe? was accepted at IMC 2016.  
  • (7/2016) Congratulations to Scott Ruoti for successfully defending his PhD dissertation. He has accepted a position at MIT Lincoln Lab.
  • (7/2016) Daniel Zappala and I will receive a DHS grant for our TrustBase TLS research project.
  • (6/2017) Our paper End-to-End Passwords was accepted to appear at NSPW 2017.
  • (6/2017) Our paper Private Webmail 2.0: Simple and Easy-to-Use Secure Email was accepted at UIST 2016.
  • (6/2016) Our paper Content-based Security for the Web was accepted at NSPW 2016.
  • (5/2016) Our paper User Attitudes Toward the Inspection of Encrypted Traffic was accepted at SOUPS 2016.
  • (2/2016) Our paper that was accepted to appear at CHI 2016 will receive an Honorable Mention Award, given to roughly 4% of the papers that were submitted to CHI.
  • (1/2016) Scott Ruoti will present the paper “We’re on the Same Page”: A Usability Study of Secure Email Using Pairs of Novice Users at the 34th Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2016), San Jose, CA, USA. This paper represents the first published collaboration between our lab and the Internet Research Lab.
  • (8/2015) Kent Seamons and Daniel Zappala received an NSF grant for Middleware for Certificate-Based Authentication.  This is a three-year award for $496,900. The goal of this research is to develop a trust platform that consolidates the decision-making process into a single location to provide a correct, consistent, and usable service for all existing and future applications.
  • (7/2015) Kent Seamons presented Recommendations for a Graduate Seminar in Usable Security at the Workshop on Usable Security and Privacy Education on July 22, 2015 in Ottawa, Canada.
  • (5/2015) Kent Seamons will present the paper Authentication Melee: A Usability Analysis of Seven Web Authentication Systems at the 24th Annual International Conference on World Wide Web (WWW 2015), Florence, Italy, on May 20, 2015. The acceptance rate at the conference was 14% this year. Scott Ruoti (lead author) and Brent Roberts were the two students that worked on this project.
  • (8/2014) Kent Seamons and Daniel Zappala in the BYU Computer Science Department were awarded a Google Faculty Research Award in Summer 2014. Their project is titled TLS Proxies: Friend or Foe?. The project is using an innovative Google AdWords campaign to measure the prevalence of TLS proxies in the wild. They are also conducting Amazon Mechanical Turks user surveys to determine user attitudes toward inspection of the encrypted traffic.
  • (7/2013) Scott Ruoti presented the paper  Confused Johnny: When Automatic Encryption Leads to Confusion and Mistakes 9th Annual Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security (SOUPS 2013), Newcastle, United Kingdom, July 2013.
  • (6/2013) ISRL students win Cyber Challenge 2011 Capture-the-Flag Contest Scoreboard sponsored by Mitre. Students Honored for Hacking Computers (BYU News) BYU Students Receive Top Cybersecurity Award (Church News) Students Capture the Flag and Seven Awards in Hacking Competition (College newsletter) BYU students take first place at hacking competition (KSL).